Resistor color code calculator

 

This resistor color code calculator will help you determine the value of axial resistors marked with color bands. It can be used for 3, 4, 5 and 6 band resistors. You can select the colors of the corresponding bands by clicking on them in the table. The resistor will visually show your band color choices and display the value of the resistor above. If the resistance value is part of a standard E-series value, this will be shown in brackets after the resistance value. How to use the color code calculator Select the amount of bands of the resistor on the top-left Choose the colors of the bands by clicking on the corresponding box in the chart The corresponding ohmic value and tolerance of the resistor is shown Bands: 3 4 5 6 10k&#8486 ±5% 1st digit 2nd digit 3rd digit multiply tolerance TCR(ppm/K) Bad Black 0 0 0 1 1% (F) 100 Beer Brown 1 1 1 10 2% (G) 50 Rots Red 2 2 2 100 15 Our Orange 3 3 3 1K 25 Young Yellow 4 4 4 10K Guts Green 5 5 5 100K 0.5% (D) But Blue 6 6 6 1M 0.25% (C) 10 Vodka Violet 7 7 7 10M 0.1% (B) 5 Goes Gray 8 8 8 100M 0.05% (A) Well White 9 9 9 1G Get Gold 0.1 5% (J) Some Silver 0.01 10% (K) Now None 20% (M) Special cases 6 band resistors In the case of 6 band resistors, this calculator assumes the 6th band is used to indicate the thermal coefficient. In some rare cases the 6th band can also indicate the reliability of the resistor. For more information visit the main page on the resistor color code. Disclaimer While we did our best to check all possibilities and remove [… read more]

Resistor SMD code

 
Resistor SMD code

What are SMD Resistors? SMD stands for Surface Mounted Device. An SMD is any electronic component that is made to use with SMT, or Surface Mount Technology. SMT was developed to meet the ongoing desire for printed circuit board manufacture to use smaller components and be faster, more efficient, and cheaper. SMDs are smaller than their traditional counterparts. They are often square, rectangular or oval in shape, with very low profiles. Instead of wire leads that go through the PCB, SMD’s have small leads or pins that are soldered to pads on the surface of the board. This eliminates the need for holes in the board, and lets both sides of the board be more fully used. The manufacture of PCBs using SMT is similar to that for components with leads. Small pads of silver or gold plate or tin-lead are placed on the board for attaching the components. Solder paste, a mixture of flux and small balls of solder, is then applied to the mounting pads by a machine similar to a computer printer. Once the PCB is prepared, SMDs are placed on it using a machine called a pick-and-place machine. The components are fed to the machine in long tubes, on rolls of tape or in trays. These machines can attach thousands of components per hour; one manufacturer advertises a rate as high as 60,000cph. The board is then sent through a reflow soldering oven. In this oven, the board is slowly brought up to a temperature that will melt the solder. Once cooled, the board is cleaned to remove solder flux residue and stray solder particles. A visual inspection checks for missing or out-of-position parts and that the board is clean. SMD resistor calculator This calculator helps you to find the resistance value of surface mount resistors. [… read more]

Resistor color code

 
Resistor color code

How does the resistor color code work? Resistor values are often indicated with color codes. Practically all leaded resistors with a power rating up to one watt are marked with color bands. The coding is defined in the international standard IEC 60062. This standard describes the marking codes for resistors and capacitors. It includes also numerical codes, as for example often used for SMD resistors. The color code is given by several bands. Together they specify the resistance value, the tolerance and sometimes the reliability or failure rate. The number of bands varies from three till six. As a minimum, two bands indicate the resistance value and one band serves as multiplier. The resistance values are standardized, these values are called preferred value. Resistor color code chart The chart below shows how to determine the resistance and tolerance for resistors. The table can also be used to specify the color of the bands when the values are known. An automatic resistor calculator can be used to quickly find the resistor values. Tips for reading resistor codes In the sections below examples are given for different numbers of bands, but first some tips are given to read the color code: The reading direction might not always be clear. Sometimes the increased space between band 3 and 4 give away the reading direction. Also, the first band is usually the closest to a lead. A gold or silver band (the tolerance) is always the last band. It is a good practice to check the manufacturer’s documentation to be sure about the used coding system. Even better is to measure the resistance with a multi-meter. In some cases this might even be the only way to figure out the resistance; for example when the color bands are burnt off. 4 band resistor The [… read more]